THE WEED WITH CHARLO GREENE

25 May

Three Ways to Fix U.S. Marijuana Laws

Even as U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions continues to say terrible things about marijuana and hint at a potential crackdown against states that have approved recreational or medical sales, assorted members of Congress have introduced legislation aimed at changing the way the federal government deals with the plant, including its designation as a Schedule I narcotic by the Drug Enforcement Administration. But there’s disagreement among national leaders of the cannabis community about whether it would be preferable to shift marijuana to Schedule II or Schedule III, or to de-schedule it entirely.

HR 714, sponsored by Representative H. Morgan Griffith, a Virginia Republican, and introduced in January, would move marijuana from Schedule I, which includes heroin and acknowledges no medical benefit, to Schedule II alongside cocaine, opium and other substances that can be used medically. Another Griffith bill, HR 715, calls for marijuana to be switched from Schedule I to another DEA classification, but doesn’t specify which one. And in April, Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican from Florida, put forward HR 2020, which would place marijuana in Schedule III, where assorted stimulants (e.g., benzphetamine), depressants (amobarbital) and products such as Tylenol with codeine are listed.

Still, these legislative efforts fall short in the view of Justin Strekal, political director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML).

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Information source: westword.com

25 May

Fact Check: do the police spend over a million hours a year fighting cannabis?

According to the authoritative Crime Survey for England and Wales, 6.5% of 16 to 59-year-olds use cannabis. But fewer people are using cannabis than in 1996, when information first became available.

While much of the debate surrounding cannabis use has focused on the extent of potential harm to users, recently demands for a change in the law have focused on the benefit to the criminal justice system that legalisation might deliver.

The Liberal Democrats claim that a legal, regulated market for cannabis will save 1.04m police hours annually (just over half of this they calculate is spent on supply). Their calculations – which they shared with The Conversation – are based on Ministry of Justice (MoJ) figures of police caseloads for drug offences in 2015. They also use Treasury estimates of the number of hours police officers of different ranks (constable, sergeant or inspector) need to spend per case of cannabis possession or supply (updated from a thorough Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) study). The graph below shows the amount of time spent across officer ranks on each outcome for possession or supply of cannabis.

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Information source: theconversation.com

22 May

Ohio supreme court judge calls for legalisation of marijuana

An Ohio supreme court justice who is considering a run for governor has said it is time for the state to decriminalise marijuana.

William O’Neill, the lone Democrat holding an Ohio statewide office, said making marijuana legal was working in Colorado and doing it in Ohio would bring hundreds of millions of dollars in sales taxes.

O’Neill announced earlier this year that he was considering stepping down and making a run for governor, but he does not plan on making a decision until the end of the year.

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Information source: theguardian.com

17 May

Cannabis as pain relief for prisoner

A 31-year-man told the district court that he tried to smuggle cannabis into the Midlands Prison to help alleviate the pain his brother was experiencing from a road traffic accident.

Peter Harty (31), St Mary’s Terrace, Askeaton, Limerick, was charged with three offences, including supplying drugs into a place of detention, and drug possession, at the Midlands Prison.

Inspector Jer Glavin gave evidence that on May 19, 2016, the accused was detected passing unauthorised items to a person in the prison.

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Information source: leinsterexpress.ie

16 May

Everything you need to know about cannabis and driving

The Canadian Drug Policy Coalition released a report giving a wide review of everything we know about what happens when someone uses cannabis and then drives. Based on their findings, here are answers to some of the questions you may have around cannabis use and driving.

1. How often do people drive after using marijuana?

It’s hard to get a definite number. Roadside-testing studies show that approximately four to six per cent of drivers have used cannabis and then drove within two hours. However, in the two studies noted in the review, up to 30 per cent of people refused to participate. This could have an impact of how accurate the findings are.

Population surveys show a much higher percentage of driving after cannabis use, with self-reported data showing approximately 20 per cent of cannabis users driving within two hours of consumption.

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Information source: bnn.ca

15 May

Five Things to Know About Federal Marijuana Drug Cases

The U.S. Sentencing Commission has released its overview of 2016. Marijuana accounts for close to a quarter of federal drug cases, but this overview found that cannabis consumers typically have less serious criminal histories than users of other drugs. Reading through the report, we noted five interesting things:

1. Drug arrests are more common than any other type of federal case.
Drug cases accounted for 31.6 percent of all the cases reported to the commission in 2016; 24.1 percent of those cases were marijuana-related. The only drug that accounted for more cases was methamphetamines, at 30.8 percent.

2. More non-citizens were arrested for marijuana-related offenses than citizens.
More non-citizens had cases relating to marijuana than citizens. While 97.4 percent of crack cocaine offenders were U.S. citizens, only 43.7 percent of marijuana offenders were naturalized citizens.

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Information source: westword.com

12 May

Wine Growers vs. Weed Growers

Dear Pot Lawyer,

I read that wine growers are suing weed growers near McMinnville? What’s going on?

Yes, that’s an interesting case. The plaintiffs are vineyard developers Harihara and Parvathy Mahesh, and their vineyard owner neighbor, Momtazi Family LLC. The Maheshes and Momtazi are suing their neighbor, defendant Richard Wagner, and his parents, who, unlike your mom and dad, set Wagner up on a nice spread of land to produce and process weed. Not only do the plaintiffs not like the smell of Wagner’s weed, but they don’t like the weed itself, which they claim is damaging their grapes.

The plaintiffs are seeking injunctive relief, which means they want the court to block Wagner’s prospective cannabis operation altogether. In legal terms, the smell is alleged to be a “nuisance” and a “trespass.” But the most interesting allegation here is that, as a part of Wagner’s tortious actions, the weed will damage the wine. According to the complaint, one buyer of Momtazi grapes has already canceled its order because “the foul-smelling particles will migrate by air” and thereby ruin the Mahesh and Momtazi grapes.

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Information source: portlandmercury.com

12 May

New Hampshire on Verge of Decriminalizing Cannabis Possession

The New Hampshire Senate approved a measure Thursday that would remove criminal penalties for cannabis possession. While there are still a few hurdles to clear, the decriminalization bill is widely expected to become law.

Senators voted 17–6 in favor of the bill, House Bill 640, which would remove the threat of arrest and jail time for possession of up to three-quarters of an ounce of cannabis. The House of Representatives, which passed the original version of the bill on a 318–36 vote in February, is expected to sign off on the Senate-approved version, at which point the measure will head to Gov. Chris Sununu for his signature.

Sununu tweeted on Thursday: “I look forward to signing House Bill 640 into law.”

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Information source: leafly.com

11 May

Grew cannabis so he would not have to buy it to help sleep

So that he would not have to buy cannabis to help his sleeping problem a 61-year-old man cultivated cannabis plants at his Portadown home.

Philip Rhodes, Ulsterville Grove, Portadown, admitted two charges of possession of herbal cannabis between January 19 and February 3 this year.

He also pleaded guilty to a charge of cultivating a cannabis plant.

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Information source: portadowntimes.co.uk

09 May

Wounded warriors, veterans rally for safe access to cannabis

WASHINGTON — A veteran who lives in D.C. suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or another service-connected disability has something that similar veterans living in region do not — access to cannabis. A small group of Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans gathered in Dupont Circle Monday afternoon in a rally aimed at changing that.

“What we have is a real instance of medical discrimination around the country because veterans didn’t fight for state-by-state, we fought for the entire country,” said Attorney Brandon Wyatt of D.C., a disabled and decorated Army combat veteran who served in Iraq. He is a policy analyst for the fledgling national group Weed For Warriors Project.

The vets, some of whom suffer from PTSD, say their symptoms are alleviated by cannabis — smoked, eaten, vaporized or in capsule form. And they say disabled vets are benefiting from the drug in states where it’s legal for residents, including D.C. They say the powerful pharmaceuticals being used to treat veterans’ disabilities including Opioids and Psychotropics are so dangerous, some of the drugs are labeled with suicide warnings.

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Information source: wtop.com

THE WEED WITH CHARLO GREENE